Tag Archives: Lemon Balm

Tea Recipes from Around the Web

I’m not the only one who can come up with some delicious tea blends! Here are a few samplings from some internet neighbors.

Green Chai Spa Tea blend from Epicurious is a delightfully spicy, yet simple beverage that will perk up your afternoon snack. The ingredients are easily obtained from your local health food or herb supply store. I recommend merely sweetening with raw sugar.

Fruits from Washington offers up a wonderful Red Summer Tea recipe. Again, these herbs are pretty easy to obtain and result in a tangy, sweet taste that is perfectly complimented by a squeeze of honey. Serve with your favorite muffin for a lovely breakfast.

Relaxation Herbal Tea is the perfect way to end your hectic day. Chamomile relaxes the nerves, while oat straw, hibiscus, and rose petals nourish the body. I think you’ll find this blend to be a regular evening drink.

I very much love the ingredients used in the Less Stress Tea by Ladies Blend. The flower aromas of lavender, chamomile, and rose will lift your spirits as the peppermint, lemon balm, and catnip strengthen your nervous system. Serve this one up whenever you feel overwhelmed, sad, or discouraged.

For a beverage to jazz up your afternoon snack or your dessert platter, Moroccan Mint Tea makes a delicious choice. Definitely follow the directions to the letter and steep exactly as recommended to prevent a tea that is too bitter. I think you’ll find this one to be an unusual treat.

The world of teas and tisanes is never-ending. I hope you leap at the chances to explore new tastes.

What is a Tisane?

Tea, infusion, decoction, tisane? With all the various titles, it can be a little confusing, if not daunting when it comes to herbal preparation. Simply put – a tisane is an infusion of herbs without any leaves from the tea bush (although, camellia sinensis, tea is considered an herb). Thus, tisane and infusion mean exactly the same thing.

A tisane is an easy way to prepare herbs, made in much the same way as tea, and especially calls for flowers and leafy parts. The standard quantities for medicinal use are often 30 g of dried herb to 500 ml of water. For just a simple beverage, 2-3 teaspoons per cup of water should suffice. Be sure to only “just” boil the water as vigorous boiling dispserses the volatile oils in the steam. Merely place your herbs in a tea pot with a close fitting lid, pour hot water over, cover, and let steep 10 minutes.

Try mixing together herbs like:

-          Lavender, rose hips, and cinnamon

-          Chamomile, lemon balm, and cloves

-          Raspberry leaf, lavender, and orange peel

-          Red clover and Nettle leaf

I think you will enjoy the process of discovering great tasting drinks with helpful benefits. Definitely check out Healing Herbal Teas by Brigitte Mars for a delightful compilation of recipes, instructions, and inspiration.

Blending Your Own Herbal Teas

Find bulk echinacea at Frontier.Blending your own herbal tea is so amazingly simple; you’ll wonder why you haven’t done it sooner! For supplies, all you need is a couple of measuring spoons, funnel (completely optional), and a mason jar or two (quart size for large amounts, pint size for less). In order to start blending, it helps to understand the qualities, benefits, and indications of herbs. Start small by choosing something that you need a bit of help with, like insomnia or immune support and study the herbs that are indicated for those conditions. The art of blending enables you to “cover all the bases,” as well as enhance the taste of the tea.  Here are two recipes that are tried and true in my own household…

Women’s Tea

2 parts nettle

2 parts raspberry leaf

1 part rose hips

1 part lemon balm

1 part milky oats

Combine the herbs together in the jar and use 1 to 3 tbsp per cup of water for your tea. This tea makes a light, satisfying tonic. Enjoy 2 to 3 cups per day.

Healthy Lungs

2 parts licorice root

1 part each of elecampane root, cinnamon root, and marshmallow root

½ part Echinacea root

¼ part ginger root

Combine all the herbs in the jar. For use, use 2 tablespoons of herb to 1 cup of water. Place in a saucepan, cover, and simmer over low heat for 30 to 45 minutes. Use this tea to prevent lung congestion and/or when a cold is just beginning. It’s best sipped throughout the day, every 30 minutes to 1 hour.

For recipes and research, I definitely recommend books like Rosemary Gladstar's Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health or The Yoga of Herbs by David Frawley. Enjoy your tea!

You can find many of the items needed for these herbal teas by clicking the banner below.

All-natural and organic echinacea from frontiercoop.com